100 words a day

Summer is always a hard time for me to blog. My schedule is inconsistent– traveling, seeing friends, and doing a bunch of youth ministry stuff– and so blogging gets put on the backburner. All that to say that this week I’m planning a comeback.

For the next 30 days I’m going to focus on writing. My goal is to write 100 words each day. 100 words is not very much, but if I try writing a little bit every day I will end up accomplishing more if I had not tried.

Ashley enters the blogosphere: Simple Joys of Home

You should check out my wife’s blog, Simple Joys of Home. It’s brand new, and it’s already getting more hits than mine. If you read it, you’ll see why. Each post is an insight into why I married her.

It will mostly consist of short posts about organizing tips and funny family stories– all flowing out of her deep love for God and family. If you really want to know me, read her blog too– she’s my other half.

Ray Ortlund is a goldmine

His posts, which are always very short, readable, and encouraging, regularly hit me right on time. Need a new blog to follow for 2011? Here it is.

Two blogs to sample the gospel goodness.

Creating a gospel culture

  • The doctrine of regeneration creates a culture of humility (Ephesians 2:1-9).
  • The doctrine of justification creates a culture of inclusion (Galatians 2:11-16).
  • The doctrine of reconciliation creates a culture of peace (Ephesians 2:14-16).
  • The doctrine of sanctification creates a culture of life (Romans 6:20-23).
  • The doctrine of glorification creates a culture of hope (Romans 5:2).

The highway to strength

Our shortcomings and our failures stare us out of countenance, and then are we painfully weak.  But this also is the highway to strength: ‘When I am weak, then am I strong.

Top 15 posts of 2010

Looking back at the history of the blog posts I’ve written is like flipping through the pages of an old journal. I can remember how I wrote certain things and how I felt at that time. This year is especially that way, since in June I lost a cousin and in July we had a baby. What’s different about a blog is that you can see where the readership increased and where it was, essentially, nonexistent. Here are the 15 most read posts of 2010:
  1. Tyson Larson: No Guilt in Life, No Fear in Death
  2. Tyson Larson: Bringing us all together again
  3. Lindsey Larson: Grace for one day at a time
  4. Tyson Larson: What We’ve Learned
  5. Thoughts on Spiritual Wisdom
  6. Cow Tools: Why is Gary Larson so funny?
  7. Baby Emma Update
  8. Letter of Resignation
  9. A poem to my firstborn
  10. Taylor Mali’s slam poetry: Totally, Like, Whatever
  11. One Million Years Later
  12. Describing the indescribable: my perspective
  13. Life moments
  14. Emma Grace Durso: My firstborn
  15. Emma meets Jackson

My are my blog statistics for the year, from December ’09 to December this year.

Proletariat vs. Pundit: A Level Playing Field

Dr. John MacArthur writes about the impact of the web on our culture, and it’s sobering:

Meanwhile, the ease, immediacy, and affordability of Internet publishing has leveled the playing field between pundits and the proletariat. Anyone can start a blog, for free. Anyone with a computer (or cell phone) and an Internet connection can instantly broadcast his every opinion worldwide. Novices and scholarly authorities alike can employ the same media. Those who are most adept at gathering an audience are the ones who are being heard, not necessarily those most qualified to speak.

For the whole article, go here.

Plans for my New Blog

recycle logoI’m starting over.  Welcome to my new blog.  After learning how cheap it was to get my own domain name, I decided I’d go for it.  So here you are at my own personal website– www.ericdurso.com.

For the next few posts, I will be revisting some of my older articles I wrote for my former blog, and reposting them here.  I hope that the change won’t confuse all my followers (all 8 of you) and that this will end up being a change for the better.  Come, look around, and leave some comment feedback.  What do you think?