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November 3, 2015. Currently an assistant clinical professor of medicine at UCSF, BJ served as executive director of Zen Hospice Project for several years. He completed his fellowship in Hospice & Palliative Medicine at Harvard Medical School, with his clinical duties split between Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? Doctor Q&A: BJ Miller Palliative care aims to ease the suffering of patients and their families. And that to me has felt like a kind of a dexterity or an agility, something very good. ... [What] I'm a little proud of is the decision to work with this experience over time, to dig into it, to mine it, to find a creative energy in it. ... We understand that process pretty well, and there's a lot we can do. "My body was literally smoking.". A leading voice in reimagining the end of life experience, BJ Miller, MD is a palliative care physician at University of California, San Francisco and former Executive Director of Zen Hospice Project. Raised in Chicago, BJ studied art history as an undergraduate at Princeton University. For more than a month, operations at the guesthouse have been suspended due to lack of funding.. Hughes-Hantge Funeral Chapel - Bernice Christenson, age 95, of Gaylord, formerly of Hector, passed away Wednesday, June 8, 2016, at Oak Terrace Health Care Center in Gaylord. About BJ Miller. Awareness of death is a practice in many spiritual traditions. Oprah Winfrey speaks with Dr. BJ Miller, hospice and palliative care specialist at the University of California in San Francisco, who shares his revelations about a subject that is often taboo in our culture – the experience of death. At first, he became right-hand man to the executive director at the time, BJ Miller, a doctor and a charismatic visionary who put the Zen Hospice Project in the national conscience through a high-profile New York Times interview and a TED talk that’s been viewed more than 7.5 million times. Click here to learn more. I knew how to read that, thanks to my mother. BJ Miller is now director of the Zen Hospice in San Francisco. Suffering is a multiheaded beast. Essentially Zen expresses the need for being with whatever is happening. ... Basically palliative care is the treatment of suffering, versus the rest of medicine as the treatment of disease. That's an important distinction, because any hospice and palliative medicine team can do a lot to quell the pain and the sorrow that happens during the dying process. Disability is not something to be ashamed of. Miller is a hospice and palliative medicine physician, author, speaker, educator, and founder and President of Mettle Health.He was formerly executive director of the Zen Hospice Project and an assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. We offer courses, workshops, and training for professional, family, clinical, and volunteer caregivers. Register for What Matters Most at the End of Life. That's why I think hospice and palliative medicine is so interesting. Informed by his own experiences as a patient, BJ powerfully advocates for designing better endings. Dr. BJ Miller is a palliative care physician at UCSF, the former executive director of Zen Hospice, and a leading voice reframing society’s discourse on death and dying. As a palliative care physician at the University of California San Francisco's Cancer Center, Miller draws on his own experiences to help people with their physical, emotional and spiritual pain at the end of their lives. "I'm not afraid of death," he says. He is also a triple amputee, co-founder of a tea company, owner of a farm in Utah and a newlywed who still looks like the Ivy Leaguer he once was. Since he had looked death in the eyes, it changed the way he looked at life. In film, Miller is the subject of Netflix's Academy Award-nominated short documentary, End Game by veteran directors Rob Epstein, Jeffrey Friedman and executi… "I'm more afraid of not living a full life. To grow up around disability from a young age, to have that carved into your worldview was, you can imagine, hugely helpful for me as a 19-year-old kid with ostensibly everything going for him. So, it gets at your desire, it gets at your longing, it gets at what you're lacking. Today, BJ is a physician as the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the executive director of the Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco. The Zen Hospice Project guesthouse opened in 1990, during the height of the AIDS epidemic. But if you go there, then what has that done? ... People say, "Actually I'm afraid of the pain I imagine is going to happen during the dying process." That's very often at the heart of people's fear of being dead — like all that they're going to miss. I'm afraid of what comes next or whatever else." A Good Life And A Good Death: What Is Palliative Care? In his work in end-of-life care, he seeks to connect art, spirituality and medicine. Greater Minneapolis-St. Paul Area • Our HD360 Tours are an excellent way to showcase any space beautifully. I started doing a little work [in] arts advocacy and disability rights. Coming close to death and dealing with pain and disability inspired him to go into medicine and the field of disability rights. Let's talk about it." And medicine lit up, theoretically, as a way where I could use these experiences and pay them forward in some way or draw from them — not overcome them and put them behind me. 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