Look at the birds

Jesus tells us to “Look at the birds.” There are several imperatives in the Sermon on the Mount, but this is one probably doesn’t get the air-time it deserves. How fascinating that Jesus, to combat anxiety, prescribes bird-watching. Our busy lives often preclude times for prolonged, thoughtful observation of the created world. We’re up early, getting the kids fed and dressed and out the door, blazing off to work, tumbling in the front door afterwards, eating and reviewing the day before getting kids to bed. Our evenings often consist of screens and half-hearted, distracted conversations. The next morning starts it all again, and over time the frenzied activity oozes into our weekends, our Sundays, our family dinners, and we’re reaching a fever pitch we know is unhealthy but cannot break. Anxiety sets in, and the speed of life becomes almost unbearable. Now, we’re not only busy but worried and frenetic. Our anxiety propels us into more busyness, more activity, more unreflective routine-following.

And Jesus tells worriers: “Look at the birds.” Jesus will teach his disciples that healthy, well-fed birds are evidence of God’s fatherly care for his creation. They are taken care of by God, and shouldn’t we trust him to take care of us too? This should calm our hearts: God’s loving, providential care over the lives of his beloved children is the antidote to anxiety.

But let’s also consider that Jesus gave his disciples a very practical imperative: “Look at the birds” and then a bit later “Consider the lilies.” I wonder, is that command even doable for many Christians today? Is there room in the schedule for uninterrupted meditation on God’s created world? Do we still have the capacity to stare at something, grapple with it until it yields a lesson? In a world of beeps and buzzes and lights and sounds and likes and shares and clicks, can we meditate?

To fight worry, one must find a pace of life that makes “Look at the birds” a conceivable option. I fear too many Christians live in such a way that render Jesus’ commands to look at the birds and consider the lilies un-obeyable. These are thought activities you can’t do on the go. Nobody bird-watches in a hurry. Considering the lilies of the field can’t happen in an unsettled, frenzied life.

Our worries grow in the soils of busyness and activity, so Jesus gives us a command that forces us to stop. Slow down. Look. Ponder. Learn, and regain perspective. “Look at the birds.” 

Have you taken time lately to look at the birds? To consider the lilies? To pause, think, and remember who you are, who God is, and how he cares for you?

4 Replies to “Look at the birds”

  1. Thank you Eric for this reminder. Uncle Jack and I were just looking at the birds this morning- it’s regenerating! God is so good; every good and perfect gift is from above:)

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