Bullets are Easy. Dishes are Harder.

How come it’s so easy to say you’d take a bullet for your wife, but it’s so difficult to help with the dishes sometimes?

Paul speaks to husbands in Ephesians 5 and tells them to love their wives as Christ loved the church. That’s a tall order. Christ was beaten, mocked, and tortured for the church. And Paul calls husbands to a similar kind of sacrifice.

I think it’s easy to romanticize the act of laying down your life for the person you love.  It’s easy to say you’d die for her, it’s not as easy to put down the book and help her clean up. It’s easy to take the bullet; it’s difficult to take the trash out.

Is it just me, or am I on to something? Men love the great and glorious. The epics. The heroic. Men love that kind of stuff. That’s why we like movies like Braveheart, where the hero lays down his life for his country and other stories of great sacrifice for a great love. Gladiator. Lord of the Rings. I think it’s healthy for men to have thoughts like these. Men are wired to be fighters- to accomplish things.  The potential problem with that kind of thinking is that is causes us (or just me?) to trivialize the day to day service and sacrifice.

I am learning to stop living in the hypothetical and start living in reality. Hypothetically, if a bullet shattered through our window I’d dive in front of Ashley. Does that mean I am loving Ashley like Christ loved the church?

No. Because that’s not happening right now.

What’s happening in reality matters. That’s real faith. And often, that means doing dishes, not taking a hypothetical bullet.

5 Replies to “Bullets are Easy. Dishes are Harder.”

  1. LOVE this blog baby! I love you, thank you for being such a loving and godly husband…you are a joy to follow my love! …and good point about the comparison of our lives with Christ to Andy. 🙂

  2. well said. Non only does this apply to marriage, but also to our lives with chirst. I think all of us would take a bullet for christ, but we have trouble doing the little things, like doing devotions in the morning, taking time to memorize verses, talking with friends about spiritual things. etcs.

  3. So good, very convicting – I think you are exactly right – it’s healthy to have these thoughts, but if you aren’t doing the day to day aspects the thoughts of dying glory are really self-pride and directed at your legacy vs. love of your wife.

  4. It’s not just you. I’ve thought this many times. How I’d love to “go out in a blaze of glory,” but don’t want to stop reading to listen to my wife’s work day stories. I think in our America, they are probably more women that are actual heroes as opposed to cyber-gun-toting “grown” men talking trash to someone’s avatar at 3am.

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